How To Write Like a Male or Female

I found this cool website that guesses your gender based on your writing style. The code for how it works is pretty simple. It's just a weighted list of "masculine words" and "feminine words".

These are 4 tables of words to use. One for writing like a male (formal), one for writing like a male (informal), one for writing like a female (formal), and one for writing like female (informal).

Here are the words to use to write like a male in informal situations, with a maleness score. The higher the score, the more "manly" it is.

Word to Use Maleness
some 58
this 44
as 37
now 33
good 31
something 26
if 25
ever 21
is 19
the 17
well 15
in 10

Here are the words to use to write like a female in informal situations, with a femaleness score. The higher the score, the more "womanly" it is.

Word to Use Femaleness
him 73
actually 69
so 64
because 55
everything 44
but 43
like 43
am 42
more 41
out 39
too 38
has 33
since 25

Here are the words to use to write like a male in formal situations.

Word to Use Maleness
around 43
what 35
more 34
are 28
as 23
who 19
below 8
is 8
these 8
the 7
a 6
at 6
it 6
many 6
said 5
above 4
to 2

Here are the words to use to write like a female in formal situations.

Word to use Femaleness
with 52
if 47
not 27
where 18
be 17
when 17
your 17
her 9
we 8
should 7
she 6
and 4
me 4
myself 4
hers 3
was 1

Obviously, you can't only use words from one table. You're going to need to use words for both males and females in order to sound natural, but if you want to maleify or femaleify your writings, perhaps for a character in a story you're writing, or maybe if you're a spy trying to cover up your identity, just sprinkle in some more words from the category you want into whatever you wrote. That should be enough to tip the scale. Again, go check out the website I linked at the top if you want something to analyze your writing.

The webpage above is inspired by a paper that goes into greater detail about writing styles with gender , but web page doesn't analyze your text that deeply, instead only looking at word frequencies. The paper says that females tend to talk more about relationships and use more compliments and apologies. Also men tend to talk more about objects, while women tend to talk more about people. Men tend to use more determiners (a, the, that, these), while women use more pronouns (I, you, she, her). So a woman might say, "My main aim in this article is", but a man might say "The main aim of this article is". Women use more "involved" writing with people, getting the reader "involved", while men use more "informative" writing.

P.S According to the guy, this is only 60% to 70% accurate, so don't look too deeply into the results.

P.P.S. Informal language might have changed a bit since the writings the paper analyzed.

P.P.S. Apparently, Europeans write with a weak emphasis, so they appear more neutral. Maybe it's because they don't learn english from their male or female friends, but more from classrooms and mass media, which isn't specifically male or female english.